Photo
pluon:

rnugler:

thecaucasian-asian:

nutellaesmerelda:

Animated art gif

squint at it when you look at it

this is incredible

wowowowow

pluon:

rnugler:

thecaucasian-asian:

nutellaesmerelda:

Animated art gif

squint at it when you look at it

this is incredible

wowowowow

(Source: giphy.com, via mega-zuzu)

Tags: art
Photo
thehurminator:

I FOUND ITTHE BEST PAINTING OF ALL TIME
It’s called Adam and Eve (or something along those lines, there’s two versions and it’s translated) and the first time I saw it I couldn’t stop laughing for a solid five minutes.
Just look at this shit.
If you just glance at it, it looks like God is flipping off Adam and Eve.

Then you have Adam here like “Hey man, why are you so pissed at me, its all her fault.”

Meanwhile the animals look like someone took a candid photo with a really bright camera flash, even though this was painted in 1623.

The horse is stoned as hell.

Even the babies with God have no clue what is going on, this kid is confused as fuck.

Also, motherfuckin’ flying baby heads because why the hell not.

Like it’s so random the entire rest of the painting is like “what the fuck is this shit.”

Best painting ever.
THE FLYING BABY HEADS HELP I CAN’T BREATHE

thehurminator:

I FOUND IT

THE BEST PAINTING OF ALL TIME

It’s called Adam and Eve (or something along those lines, there’s two versions and it’s translated) and the first time I saw it I couldn’t stop laughing for a solid five minutes.

Just look at this shit.

If you just glance at it, it looks like God is flipping off Adam and Eve.

image

Then you have Adam here like “Hey man, why are you so pissed at me, its all her fault.”

image

Meanwhile the animals look like someone took a candid photo with a really bright camera flash, even though this was painted in 1623.

image

The horse is stoned as hell.

image

Even the babies with God have no clue what is going on, this kid is confused as fuck.

image

Also, motherfuckin’ flying baby heads because why the hell not.

image

Like it’s so random the entire rest of the painting is like “what the fuck is this shit.”

image

Best painting ever.

THE FLYING BABY HEADS HELP I CAN’T BREATHE

(via pkmntrainersola)

Tags: art
Photoset

art-of-swords:

Rare Khanda Sword

  • Dated: 15th or 16th century
  • Culture: Indian
  • Place of Origin: probably South India
  • Measurements: overall length: 32.25in (820mm). Blade length: 26.5in (670mm)

This is a very rare and very early Indian sword. It has an unusual Khanda style with a double edged blade, two wide fullers running the entire length, and a flared tip. There is an etched number of “1888” which is probably a museum or armoury number.

The sword is very ornate and has heavy blade straps with lovely cut and shaped edges, almost in a Gothic style. The straps join a Yonic shaped cup of two pieces, from which extends the grip, which is entirely punch-dot marked.

The pommel has been restored with a copper disc, it is likely that this is an old repair, and is common in these swords, since the original swords had fragile pommel discs sometimes fixed with wood, which would rot with age.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Akaal Arms

(via elizazile)

Tags: sword art history
Link

Expressed my thoughts perfectly.

(Source: thatmathblog)

Quote
"New radiocarbon dating results indicate that six seals painted on the walls of the Nerja cave in Málaga, southern Spain, are more than 42,000 years old, making them the oldest human art on record. Neanderthals lived in the area at that time — they died out about 30,000 years ago — and they are known to have eaten seals. The Homo sapiens who followed them also painted on the cave walls, but no depictions of seals have been found in any of their art."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn21458-first-neanderthal-cave-paintings-discovered-in-spain.html

(Source: thehistoryblog.com, via hillbillyplease)

Video

How to Turn a Sphere Inside Out

Part 1, part 2 explains the last step in more detail.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7d13SgqUXg&feature=related

Photo
jtotheizzoe:

This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to the discovery of quasicrystals. These nonrepeating, yet ordered crystalline structures were first described by winner Dan Shechtman in 1984.
But as far back as 500 years ago, Islamic artists were using these patterns in mosque tilings. Their intricate patterns were nearly perfect quasicrystals, matching the beauty of nature in a man-made form.
(via NPR)

jtotheizzoe:

This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to the discovery of quasicrystals. These nonrepeating, yet ordered crystalline structures were first described by winner Dan Shechtman in 1984.

But as far back as 500 years ago, Islamic artists were using these patterns in mosque tilings. Their intricate patterns were nearly perfect quasicrystals, matching the beauty of nature in a man-made form.

(via NPR)

(via jtotheizzoe)

Link

Some art pieces are really over priced.

But this blog is really good, check it out if you have time.

Tags: art art sumo
Photo
neptunesknickerbockers:

toyparade:

fictionincarnate:

Bob Ross is here to fuck you guys up with some truth.

kekekekekekekekeke

Aw

neptunesknickerbockers:

toyparade:

fictionincarnate:

Bob Ross is here to fuck you guys up with some truth.

kekekekekekekekeke

Aw

(Source: magicsotragic, via elizazile)

Tags: art life
Photo
14-billion-years-later:

warholsoup:

chicaintcheap:

sagebrown:

Rhythm 0, 1974
To test the limits of the relationship between performer and  audience, Abramović developed one of her most challenging (and  best-known) performances. She assigned a passive role to herself, with  the public being the force which would act on her.
Abramović had placed upon a table 72 objects that people were allowed  to use (a sign informed them) in any way that they chose. Some of these  were objects that could give pleasure, while others could be wielded to  inflict pain, or to harm her. Among them were scissors, a knife, a  whip, and, most notoriously, a gun and a single bullet. For six hours  the artist allowed the audience members to manipulate her body and  actions.
Initially, members of the audience reacted with caution and modesty,  but as time passed (and the artist remained impassive) several people  began to act quite aggressively. As Abramović described it later:
“The experience I learned was that…if you leave decision to the  public, you can be killed.” … “I felt really violated: they cut my  clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my  head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere.  After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward  the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.”  

14-billion-years-later:

warholsoup:

chicaintcheap:

sagebrown:

Rhythm 0, 1974

To test the limits of the relationship between performer and audience, Abramović developed one of her most challenging (and best-known) performances. She assigned a passive role to herself, with the public being the force which would act on her.

Abramović had placed upon a table 72 objects that people were allowed to use (a sign informed them) in any way that they chose. Some of these were objects that could give pleasure, while others could be wielded to inflict pain, or to harm her. Among them were scissors, a knife, a whip, and, most notoriously, a gun and a single bullet. For six hours the artist allowed the audience members to manipulate her body and actions.

Initially, members of the audience reacted with caution and modesty, but as time passed (and the artist remained impassive) several people began to act quite aggressively. As Abramović described it later:

“The experience I learned was that…if you leave decision to the public, you can be killed.” … “I felt really violated: they cut my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.  

Video

Super Fast Spray Paint Artist

Quote
"The chess pieces are the block alphabet which shapes thoughts; and these thoughts, although making a visual design on the chess-board, express their beauty abstractly, like a poem… I have come to the personal conclusion that while all artists are not chess players, all chess players are artists."

Marcel Duchamp

(Source: enpasant)